Recycling and Zero Waste

We're working to lead a movement toward a Zero Waste society. 

Our role is helping effect a cultural transformation in the way we design, consume, and dispose of products, with a focus on "better, not more."

Recycle Ann Arbor Logo

In 1970, we developed one of the country's first community-based recycling programs, and today we provide recycling and reuse services through our nonprofit subsidiary, Recycle Ann Arbor (RAA). RAA collects curbside recyclables in Ann Arbor, and runs the Drop-Off StationReUse Center, and Jackson Road Recovery Yard, allowing households and businesses to recycle or reuse their unwanted items.

Today we seek to reduce and eventually eliminate waste from the material economy, so that all products are reused, repurposed, recycled - or not even created in the first place. In this field, our direct services are provided in Ann Arbor and southeast Michigan - and our education and advocacy efforts have a broader scope.

 

Our Zero Waste work includes:

 

News

December 27, 2016
News
A material recovery facility is the hub of a community’s recycling program. It can spark regional economic development; provide good local jobs; be a key component in recycling education; and guarantee the environmental benefits of recycling are realized.
September 28, 2016
News
The Dearborn Education and Action on Recycling program (DEAR) seeks to use Dearborn's schools as agents of community and environmental change by reducing the amount of contamination in Dearborn's recycling system.
August 31, 2016
News
The EPA estimates that a child bringing a brown bag lunch to school every day throws away about 67 pounds of waste each school year. Learn how to tweak school lunch preparations to prevent the creation of tons of trash and keep chemicals of concern out of your child's lunch.
August 9, 2016
News
On July 7, 2016, the City of Ann Arbor evicted ReCommunity, the long-time operator of its materials recovery facility (MRF), for safety violations at the City’s facility.  Since then, City actions have sowed confusion throughout the community about recycling. 
March 28, 2016
News
Decorations, costumes, accessories, toys, school supplies, kitchen items, garden tools, apparel, floor tiles, and more, the Ecology Center sampled more than 1,500 of these products for a recently published, peer-reviewed study and uncovered startling results.

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