In order to create an economy that produces goods and services that restore ecosystems, increase community and ecological resilience, advance justice and are safe throughout their lifecycle, we are going to need a lot  of innovation. 

The Ecology Center helped create the nation’s first state-supported Green Chemistry Program to drive innovation in Michigan.   We helped launch an international movement to transform the health care sector to make it a lever for change across all sectors.  We advocate for innovative policy to drive the production of safer products,  and we are a watchdog so that the cost of doing the wrong thing is sufficient to create an incentive to innovate toward greener products and processes.

Published on January 26, 2017

News

Capped with Toxics
Press Release  |  July 13, 2021
A new report by the Toxic Free Food Campaign in partnership with Ecology Center Healthy Stuff Lab titled “Capped With Toxics” found toxic chemicals called ortho-phthalates in more than one-third of the 141 beverage brands tested. Market leaders are switching to safer bottle caps,
News  |  June 1, 2021
Fifty-one years ago today, Elizabeth Grant Kingwill and seven other advocates formally founded the Ecology Center, as the organizers of America’s first and largest Earth Day events planned to keep the spirit of the new grassroots environmental movement alive.
News  |  May 28, 2021
Ecology Center found PFAS in all tested fertilizer and compost products. Check these products labels to find out the source of the materials. Ingredients listed as “biosolids” and “residuals” are code words for sewage sludge.
Press Release  |  March 30, 2021
The latest annual report card scoring retailer actions on toxic chemicals is out. About 2/3 of the companies have made progress over the last year.
News  |  October 16, 2020
We are fortunate to be able to highlight some victories related to protecting people from toxic PFAS in our drinking water and environment.
PFAS in Fast Food Packaging
Press Release  |  August 6, 2020
The new report shows that all six food chains sampled had one or more food packaging items that likely contain toxic PFAS (per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances)—chemicals known to threaten human health.